Dating points in peshawar






Actual excavations by any country other than France did not occur until after World War II. A brief survey had been made by two Englishmen in 1938 (E. Barger and P. Wright, Excavations in Swat and Explorations in the Oxus Territories of Afghanistan , MASI 64, 1941). In 1947 R. E. Mortimer Wheeler, Director-General of Archaeology in India, made an official three-week tour (see his “Archaeology in Afghanistan,” Antiquity 21/82, 1947, pp. 57-65). Surface collections were made by B. de Cardi in 1950 in Qandahār and Farāh provinces. Finally site excavations began in the winter of 1950-51 during the second expedition of the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) directed by W. Fairservis, when Šamšīr Ḡār and Deh Morāsī Ḡonday, 17 miles southwest of Qandahār, were investigated by L. Dupree. This work provided the first Bronze Age data for the territory of Afghanistan. Subsequent American research dealt principally with the prehistoric period. In 1954 C. Coon discovered, in the rock-shelter at Qara Kamar, an Aurignacian Upper Paleolithic blade industry (ca. 32,000 .) and a Mesolithic one (ca. 10,500 .). Dupree (director of the AMNH mission until 1970, thereafter the American Universities Field Staff representative) made an extensive survey in northern Afghanistan in 1959; he followed this with excavations at Āq Koprūk, where findings included a large and fine Upper Paleolithic assemblage (ca. 15,000-10,000 .). Further important finds are noted in the survey section, below. Other Americans investigated in the Sīstān deserts, where results were especially important for the Islamic period: G. Dales led work for the University of Pennsylvania’s University Museum (1968-71); and W. Trousdale explored for the Smithsonian Institution (1971-77).

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Dating points in peshawar

Dating points in peshawar



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